Anzac - The Hill 60 cemetery

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HILL 60 CEMETERY

By this time companies had become very mixed, and the charge was composed of a crowd of man belonging to all the companies, mad with the lust for battle.  Their officers did little to restrain them, for their Irish blood was aflame, and they were as eager as the men.  The line surged up the bare exposed glacis, only to encounter tremendously heavy rifle and machine gun fire from the crest.  At the same moment the enemy’s guns opened, displaying marvellous accuracy in ranging, and the attack was annihilated.  In spite of this the men went on as long as they were able to stand, and fell still facing the foe.  From the wells below their bodies could be seen, lying in ordered ranks on the hillside, with the bayonets pointing to the front.

"The Tenth (Irish) Division",
(Dublin 1993), Major Bryan Cooper, p. 108.

Humain remains collected on Hill 60 by the Imperial War Graves Commision team during 1919

Hill 60 Cemetery

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IF STONES COULD SPEAK - ANZAC

 

 

closest friend, who, white and trembling, confined that he was afraid.  The New Zealander, J.F. Rudd, did all he could to comfort his friend but the latter was sure he was soon to be killed.  With final checking of ammunition and guns completed, “I can still remember the feeling as we looked at our watches and saw the time creeping nearer to five o’clock.  The whistle went and out hopped the first row of men and they fell like ninepins, then the second row went out and my friend Jack Bindon’s premonition was fulfilled”.

Trooper J.F. Rudd (CMR) quoted in
"Men of Gallipoli", Peter H. Liddle, p. 210

 

 

Hill 60

To the infantry waiting in the trenches on Damakjelik Bair  it seemed that very few of the shells landed in the

"Humain remains collected on Hill 60 by the Imperial War Graves Commision team during 1919", picture reproduced from "Gallipoli Then and Now", (London 2000), Steve Newman, p. 159.

Map detail reproduced from "Military Operations: Gallipoli", Volume II - maps & appendices, (London 1929), Brigadier-General Cecil F. Aspinall-Oglander.



 

Turkish positions on Hill 60.  Certainly the Turks,seeing the Suvla Bay advance, were alert and expecting an attack.  As the New Zealanders charged forward they were met by intense, accurate Turkish Fire. Lt Gordon Harper noticed his sergeant, George Ferguson, cracking jokes with the men as they waited for the artillery to lift.  “His body was the first we had to jump over as we left the parapet.  His South African ribbons were still on his breast”.

"Gallipoli-
The New Zealand Story", (Auckland 1998), Christopher Pugsley, p. 317

 

Lance Sergeant George Weir Ferguson

 

Just before one of these attacks a New Zealander was approached by his closest friend, who, white and trembling, confined that he was afraid.Just before one of these attacks a New Zealander was approached by his

 


Trooper John Bindon

 

 

 


 

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Last updated : 01/12/06

 

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